The Priceless Ming Jar Used as an Umbrella Stand | Discovery

The Priceless Ming Jar Used as an Umbrella Stand | Discovery

‘The owner always thought this was an 18th-century jar, a decorative object,’ explains Marco Almeida, a specialist in Chinese Ceramics and Works of Art at Christie’s in London. This magnificent and very rare large blue and white ‘Dragon’ jar was being used as an umbrella stand, when Almeida got in touch with the owner who agreed to send it to London to be inspected. ‘Once it arrived, we were absolutely speechless,’ the specialist recalls. ‘The more we studied it, the better it got.’ As the team of specialists looked at the jar, they realised they were handling an ‘incredibly important piece of Chinese porcelain from the Ming Dynasty.’ In this video, Chi Fan Tsang, a fellow specialist in Chinese Ceramics and Works of Art, discusses the details that make this piece so special, including the significance of the five-clawed dragon, and the cross mark on the base of the vessel. ‘It is an incredibly expensive umbrella stand,’ smiles Almeida. Indeed it was — this dragon jar sold for HK$158,040,000 / $20,447,642 in 30 Years: The Sale on 30 May in Hong Kong. Read more at http://www.christies.com/features/Discovery-The-Ming-Dynasty-Dragon-jar-being-used-an-umbrella-stand-7581-3.aspx

Vase sells for $83 million

Vase sells for $83 million

An imperial Chinese vase dated to the 1740s and found in a London attic has set an auction record for an Asian artwork after selling for $83 million.

Crazy 425.000 dollar auction from white chinese porcelain. experts couldn't believe it.

Crazy 425.000 dollar auction from white chinese porcelain. experts couldn't believe it.

Follow this crazy bidding on an auction on a dutch TV show. they sell a little statue. Experts valued it on 300 euros. But they had no idea what was going to happen... I created this video with the YouTube Video Editor (http://www.youtube.com/editor)

Ming-era wine cup breaks auction record for Chinese porcelain

Ming-era wine cup breaks auction record for Chinese porcelain

HONG KONG: A rare Ming-era wine cup broke the world auction record for any Chinese porcelain on Tuesday, selling in Hong Kong for US$36.05 million to Shanghai tycoon Liu Yiqian, Sotheby's auction house said. The tiny white porcelain cup, decorated with a colour painting of a rooster and a hen tending to their chicks, was made during the reign of the Chenghua Emperor between 1465 and 1487. The price sets a new record for Chinese porcelain, according to Sotheby's, beating the previous record held by a gourd-shaped vase from the Qianlong period, which sold for HK$252.66 million (US$32.58 million) in 2010. The price far exceeded the previous world record for Ming Dynasty porcelain -- which was held by a blue and white vase that sold for HK$168.66 million in 2011. Nicolas Chow, deputy chairman of Sotheby's Asia, described the cup as the "holy grail" of Chinese art. "There is no more legendary object in the history of Chinese porcelain. This is an object bathed in mythology," he told reporters after the sale. "It has gone to an extraordinarily good home in Shanghai in the collection of Liu Yiqian." Bidding started at HK$160 million, with Liu putting up the winning bid over the telephone after a lengthy battle among hopeful buyers. A taxi-driver turned financier, 50-year-old Liu is one of China's wealthiest people and among a new class of Chinese super-rich scouring the globe for artwork. Worth an estimated US$1.6 billion and with two museums to his name, Liu made headlines in the art world when he bought a Song-era scroll for US$8.2 million at a Sotheby's auction in New York in September -- only to have it dismissed as a fake by a trio of renowned experts. He stands by the scroll's authenticity. The chicken cup represents the pinnacle of Ming-era porcelain production, according to Sotheby's. "That period in terms of porcelain production was really the peak of material refinement," Chow told AFP, adding that emperors of later Chinese dynasties were so enamoured by the design that the chicken cup was copied extensively. "When you buy a chicken cup... you don't just buy the object, you're buying centuries of imperial admiration for these objects," he said, adding that it could be the most forged piece of Chinese porcelain. Less than 20 such cups are known to exist, with just four in private collections, Chow said, adding that this will become the only genuine chicken cup in China upon its return. Hong Kong has emerged as one of the biggest auction hubs alongside New York and London, fuelled by China's economic boom and demand from Asian collectors, especially wealthy Chinese buyers. - AFP/de A rare Ming-era wine cup broke the world auction record for any Chinese porcelain on Tuesday, selling in Hong Kong for US$36.05 million to Shanghai tycoon Liu Yiqian, Sotheby's auction house said. Chinese Ming-era 'chicken cup' sells for record $38.5 millions. The $30 million cup: 'Holy grail' of Chinese art smashes porcelain price record. Rare Chinese cup sold for $36m at auction. Ming-era 'chicken cup' breaks record for Chinese porcelain. Ming dynasty 'chicken cup' smashes record in $36-million. Ming-era 'chicken cup' breaks record for Chinese porcelain. Ming-era wine cup breaks auction record for Chinese porcelain. Ming-era chicken cup sells for record €26.3m. 'Chicken Cup' Sets China Auction Record With $36 Million. Ming-era 'chicken cup' sells for $36.05 million breaking record for Chinese porcelain. Chinese Ming cup smashes sale record. Ming-era wine cup breaks auction record for Chinese porcelain. Tiny Ming-era 'Chicken Cup' sells for record-breaking £19.6 million. Chinese Ming cup smashes sale record. Chinese chicken cup fetches record £21m at auction. Click link to subscribe to Red Phoenix Channel : http://www.youtube.com/user/TheRedPhoenixOne?sub_confirmation=1 Click to view this channel for more videos : https://www.youtube.com/user/TheRedPhoenixOne

How to Collect... Chinese Ceramics and Works of Art

How to Collect... Chinese Ceramics and Works of Art

Chi Fan Tsang, Head of the Chinese Ceramics and Works of Art Department at Christie’s Hong Kong, discusses what she looks for in works of art and explains where her passion comes from. Find out more about how to collect Chinese ceramics: http://www.christies.com/features/chinese-ceramics-collecting-guide-7224-1.aspx

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