Population pyramids: Powerful predictors of the future - Kim Preshoff

Population pyramids: Powerful predictors of the future - Kim Preshoff

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/population-pyramids-powerful-predictors-of-the-future-kim-preshoff Population statistics are like crystal balls -- when examined closely, they can help predict a country's future (and give important clues about the past). Kim Preshoff explains how using a visual tool called a population pyramid helps policymakers and social scientists make sense of the statistics, using three different countries' pyramids as examples. Lesson by Kim Preshoff, animation by TED-Ed.

Urbanization and the future of cities - Vance Kite

Urbanization and the future of cities - Vance Kite

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/urbanization-and-the-future-of-cities-vance-kite About 10,000 years ago, hunter-gatherers, aided by rudimentary agriculture, moved to semi-permanent villages and never looked back. With further developments came food surpluses, leading to commerce, specialization and, many years later with the Industrial Revolution, the modern city. Vance Kite plots our urban past and how we can expect future cities to adapt to our growing populations. Lesson by Vance Kite, animation by ATMG Studio.

How to Read a Population Pyramid

How to Read a Population Pyramid

A Population Pyramid, is a graphical representation that shows the distribution of various age groups and gender in a population. There are three main pyramid shapes: Youthful Population, an ageing population and an aged population pyramid. The different shaped pyramids all correspond to different stages of the Demographic Transition Model.

The Arctic vs. the Antarctic - Camille Seaman

The Arctic vs. the Antarctic - Camille Seaman

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-arctic-vs-the-antarctic-camille-seaman How can you tell the two poles apart? Where are the penguins? What about the bears? The Arctic pole is located in the Northern Hemisphere within the deep Arctic Ocean, while the Antarctic pole is smack in the middle of the ice-covered Antarctica. Camille Seaman describes how enterprising people and organisms have found ways to reside around both poles despite the frigid temperatures. Lesson by Camille Seaman, animation by Provincia Studio.

7 Billion: How Did We Get So Big So Fast? | SKUNK BEAR

7 Billion: How Did We Get So Big So Fast? | SKUNK BEAR

http://skunkbear.tumblr.com It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West. As higher standards of living and better health care are reaching more parts of the world, the rates of fertility — and population growth — have started to slow down, though the population will continue to grow for the foreseeable future. U.N. forecasts suggest the world population could hit a peak of 10.1 billion by 2100 before beginning to decline. But exact numbers are hard to come by — just small variations in fertility rates could mean a population of 15 billion by the end of the century. Produced by Adam Cole Cinematography by Maggie Starbard

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