Change the way you think - WWF

Change the way you think - WWF

We live on a finite planet and sometimes our impact on it is greater than we realize. The seemingly isolated actions we take every day—from our choice of morning beverage to our choice of business practices—are often links in a chain of unusual connections we would never have imagined. The bottom line: The health of business is directly connected to the health of the natural world. And both can grow and flourish—together. Change the way you think: http://worldwildlife.org/pages/change-the-way-you-think

A whale's eye view of Antarctica

A whale's eye view of Antarctica

​​​​Scientists have attached cameras to unlock the mysteries of whales lives in Antarctica. The cameras have helped scientists gather information on where, when and how whales feed, their social lives, and even how they must blow hard to clear sea ice so they can breathe. Crucially, this data will enable better protection of whale feeding areas. The researchers use suction cups to attach non-invasive digital tags – which contain sensors and a 'whale cam' – onto the backs of humpback and minke whales. The camera tags stay on each whale for between 24 and 48 hours before they detach and are retrieved by scientists and reused. WWF-Australia has provided funding for three 'whale cams' to help scientists better understand critical feeding areas in the Southern Ocean and the impact of shrinking ice caused by warming sea temperatures. The research is being conducted in collaboration with scientists at the Australian Antarctic Division in Hobart and under the auspices of the International Whaling Commission's, Southern Ocean Research Partnership (IWC-SORP).​​​​​​​​​​​​ Learn more about the whale cam project: https://www.worldwildlife.org/stories/a-whale-s-eye-view-of-antarctica Credit Ari Friedlander / WWF-Australia​​​ Music: Frost Waltz by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license Artist: http:incompetech.com/

Entangled Olive ridley turtle cut free from debris and released

Entangled Olive ridley turtle cut free from debris and released

A WWF-­Pakistan trained observer, Amir Rahim, successfully released an entangled Olive ridley turtle about 180 nautical miles from Karachi in the Arabian sea. According to Amir Rahim he has seen many turtles entangled in fishing nets but this was the first time he saw a turtle trapped in a polypropylene (PP) bag.

Rare Black Jaguar Sighting as Big Cat Takes Cross-River Swim

Rare Black Jaguar Sighting as Big Cat Takes Cross-River Swim

Jaguars are strong swimmers and climbers and require large areas of tropical rain forest and stretches of riverbank to survive. A model for conservation, the Amazon Region Protected Areas ensures 150 million acres—three times the size of all US parks combined—of the Amazon are protected in perpetuity. Learn more about WWF’s work to protect the Amazon: http://www.worldwildlife.org/stories/protecting-the-amazon-for-life Credits: Video - Bret Whitney Photo - © David Lawson / WWF-UK Music - "Solitary-"Lacy & Gledden/AudioNetwork

Epic Fail: Fresh water at risk

Epic Fail: Fresh water at risk

Clean, fresh water is an essential ingredient for life. Yet it’s also a increasingly at risk from climate change, expanding agriculture and other forces. WWF is working toward a water-secure future by collaborating with governments, businesses, and communities to ensure healthy freshwater systems around the world. Learn more: https://www.worldwildlife.org/initiatives/fresh-water Credits: Music from Audio Network: Shadow Play by Paul Mottram Sound effects from FreeSFX

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