24 - Goebel Reeves - Meet Me At The Crossroads Pal

24 - Goebel Reeves - Meet Me At The Crossroads Pal

goebel reeves george riley texas drifter hobo`s lullaby hobos 2005 Sounds Like Jimmie Rodgers Arlo Guthrie Utah Phillips Jack Elliot Pete Seeger Emmylou Harris The Kingston Trio George Riley the Yodeling Rustler the Broadway Wrangler October 9 1899 -- January 26 1959 American folk singer Hobo's Lullaby Woody Guthrie son Arlo Sherman Texas Reeves Austin hobo writing singing songs traveled recording music 1929 the Texas Drifter musical style resembled the Singing Brakeman Jimmie Rodgers yodeling lyrics life on the road Reeves claimed that he had taught Rodgers how to yodel as they traveled together in the 1920s Texas Drifter's recordings 2005 Sounds Like Jimmie Rodgers 19 songs 1994 CD release Hobo's Lullaby Goebel Reeves all 26 tracks 16 not on the 2005 Sounds Like Jimmie Rodgers CD

25 - Goebel Reeves - The Yodeling Teacher

25 - Goebel Reeves - The Yodeling Teacher

goebel reeves george riley texas drifter hobo`s lullaby hobos 2005 Sounds Like Jimmie Rodgers Arlo Guthrie Utah Phillips Jack Elliot Pete Seeger Emmylou Harris The Kingston Trio George Riley the Yodeling Rustler the Broadway Wrangler October 9 1899 -- January 26 1959 American folk singer Hobo's Lullaby Woody Guthrie son Arlo Sherman Texas Reeves Austin hobo writing singing songs traveled recording music 1929 the Texas Drifter musical style resembled the Singing Brakeman Jimmie Rodgers yodeling lyrics life on the road Reeves claimed that he had taught Rodgers how to yodel as they traveled together in the 1920s Texas Drifter's recordings 2005 Sounds Like Jimmie Rodgers 19 songs 1994 CD release Hobo's Lullaby Goebel Reeves all 26 tracks 16 not on the 2005 Sounds Like Jimmie Rodgers CD

Robert Johnson- Crossroad

Robert Johnson- Crossroad

delta blues music

Tim Edey plays his tune 'Celtic Thunder' on the B/C Sandpiper melodeon/accordion

Tim Edey plays his tune 'Celtic Thunder' on the B/C Sandpiper melodeon/accordion

On his last visit to The Music Room in Cleckheaton melodeon maestro had some tunes on the Sandpiper! An amzing player on an amazing instrument developed between The Music Room and Martyn Banks of the famed Oakwood boxes For more info visit www.themusicroom-online.co.u

Stephen Stills = Guitar God - Crossroads / You Can't Catch Me - 1983

Stephen Stills = Guitar God - Crossroads / You Can't Catch Me - 1983

Stephen Stills, recorded live in 1983, on the Rock & Roll Tonight TV program. What an insane performance. Guitar God - Meet- Mr. Stephen Stills "I got everything I know from Stephen Stills. Those people who thought Clapton was God hadn't heard Stills play acoustic guitar." – Michael Hedges A little history on the song Crossroads...from Wiki: "Cross Road Blues" is a song by Delta Blues singer Robert Johnson; released on a 78 rpm record in 1936 by Vocalion Records, catalogue 3519. The original version remained out of print after its initial release until the appearance of The Complete Recordings in 1990. In 1961, producer Frank Driggs substituted the previously unreleased alternative take on the first reissue of Johnson's work, the long-playing album King of the Delta Blues Singers.[2] Because of the historical significance of "Cross Road Blues", it was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1998.[1] Lyrics and interpretation "The Crossroads", where Robert Johnson supposedly sold his soul to the Devil in exchange for mastery of the blues, according to the legend. It is the intersection of U.S. Route 61 and U.S. Route 49, at Clarksdale, Mississippi, United States. The lyrics tell of the narrator's failed attempts to hitch a ride from an intersection as night approaches. The song had frequently been linked to stories of Johnson selling his soul to the devil for the ability to play music, although nothing in the actual lyrics speaks of these events.[3] Historian Leon Litwack and others state that the song refers to the common fear felt by blacks who were discovered out alone after dark; that Johnson was likely singing about the desperation of finding his way home from an unfamiliar place as quickly as possible because of a fear of lynching.[3][4] In addition, the lyrics could be allusion to the curfews that were then imposed on blacks in the South. The imagery of the singer falling to his knees and the mention of his failure to find a "sweet woman" suggests that the song is also about a deeper and more personal loneliness. [5] Finally, the lyrics can be associated to the urban legend that blues musician Tommy Johnson once sold his soul to the Devil for his musical ability. Due to having the same last name (yet no relation)to Tommy Johnson, the legend was associated with Robert Johnson more so; the film Crossroads tells the story of the song with Robert Johnson as the one who sold his soul, not Tommy Johnson. On March 10, 1968, Cream recorded a live version "Crossroads" from their performance at the Winterland Ballroom in San Francisco. The version was arranged by guitarist Eric Clapton, and included two lines borrowed from Johnson's "Traveling Riverside Blues." The song features an eight-note guitar riff and has both major and Minor scale centers.[7] Cream's cover of the song was placed at #409 on the 2004 List of Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Songs of All Time, and #3 on the 2008 Greatest Guitar Songs of All Time. The song also ranks #10 on Guitar World's 100 Greatest Guitar Solos.[8]

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