18. Street Wars of Religion: Puritans and Arminians

18. Street Wars of Religion: Puritans and Arminians

Early Modern England: Politics, Religion, and Society under the Tudors and Stuarts (HIST 251) Professor Wrightson reviews the conflicts which developed within the Church of England in the early seventeenth century and played a role in the growing tensions which led to the English civil wars. Wrightson begins by describing the 'Jacobethan consensus' which largely prevailed throughout the reign of James I, characterized by broad-based conformity and adherence to Calvinist doctrine. However, this consensus was strained by the local activism of Puritans in many areas. The success of these Puritan efforts at local reformation was uneven across the country and largely depended on whether Puritan clerics were able to secure the support of secular magistrates in order to enforce godly discipline. He next considers the Arminian movement (anti-Calvinist in doctrine and with strong elements of ritualism and clericalism) which destroyed the Jacobethan consensus. He traces how the rise of Arminianism resulted in the polarization and politicization of religion with Charles I's appointment of Arminian clerics (notably William Laud) to positions of control of the church and their repression of Puritan opponents. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Jacobethan Consensus 07:12 - Chapter 2. Puritan Reformation 25:59 - Chapter 3. Arminian Reaction 42:18 - Chapter 4. Results Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Fall 2009.

10. The Elizabethan Confessional State: Conformity, Papists and Puritans

10. The Elizabethan Confessional State: Conformity, Papists and Puritans

Early Modern England: Politics, Religion, and Society under the Tudors and Stuarts (HIST 251) Professor Wrightson discusses the Elizabethan settlement of religion and the manner in which it was defended from both 'Papist' and 'Puritan' opponents. The settlement of religion achieved in 1559 (and enforced through the Act of Uniformity) restored the royal supremacy, but was in some respects deliberately ambiguous, combining moderately Protestant doctrine with traditional forms of worship and church government. It was designed to minimize the danger of religious conflict by appealing to traditionalists as well as convinced Protestants. From the 1570s, however, the settlement came under attack from both Catholics and Puritans (the "hotter sort of Protestants" dissatisfied with the limits of the Elizabethan reformation). Wrightson describes how both threats were countered and defeated, while the Church of England gradually became normalized and accepted by the population as a whole. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Religion and Elizabeth I 13:43 - Chapter 2. Catholics 28:34 - Chapter 3. Protestants 46:01 - Chapter 4. Reformation as a Series of Confirming Experiences Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Fall 2009.

20. Constitutional Revolution and Civil War, 1640-1646

20. Constitutional Revolution and Civil War, 1640-1646

Early Modern England: Politics, Religion, and Society under the Tudors and Stuarts (HIST 251) Professor Wrightson begins his examination of the major events of the English Civil Wars which culminated ultimately with the defeat of the royalist forces and the execution of King Charles I in 1649. He describes how Charles was forced to end his personal rule and call a parliament in 1640 in order to defend England against invading Scottish armies. The events of the Short Parliament and the first sessions of the Long Parliament are examined, culminating in the outbreak of war in 1642. The composition of both royalist and parliamentarian support is discussed, followed by the war aims and strategies of the two sides and the campaigns and politics of 1642-44, leading eventually to the formation of the New Model Army under the leadership of Sir Thomas Fairfax and Oliver Cromwell. He concludes with the victory of parliamentary forces in 1645-1646. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Reemergence of Parliament 12:12 - Chapter 2. Rebellion in Ireland 14:49 - Chapter 3. Civil War: Foundations 20:52 - Chapter 4. War Begins 33:02 - Chapter 5. War Continues 47:41 - Chapter 6. Struggle Ends, for a Time Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Fall 2009.

A Train of Disasters: Puritan Reaction to New England Crisis of 1680-90s

A Train of Disasters: Puritan Reaction to New England Crisis of 1680-90s

From the 1680-1690s, Puritan New England underwent political and cultural transformations that would eventually turn it from a Puritan "covenanted society," virtually independent of the mother country, into a much more open and secular royal province. The main political events that shaped the crisis and transformations alike are the establishment of a royal Dominion of New England in 1686 and its downfall in the bloodless Boston "revolution" of 1689, "King William's War" with the French and their Algonquin allies and, most notorious of all, the Salem witchcraft trials of 1692. Studying a group of texts, written by political and spiritual elite, Galtsin focuses on how the Puritan colonies reacted to the turbulent decade, and how they saw it in a process of divinely ordained history. Speaker Biography: Dmitry Galtsin is with the department of book history at the Library of Russian Academy of Science, St. Petersburg. He is a Fulbright Fellow in the John W. Kluge Center. For captions, transcript, and more information visit

7. Late Medieval Religion and Its Critics

7. Late Medieval Religion and Its Critics

Early Modern England: Politics, Religion, and Society under the Tudors and Stuarts (HIST 251) In this lecture Professor Wrightson surveys the religious landscape of England during the later medieval period through to the reign of Henry VIII and the beginnings of the reformation. He notes that while the late medieval church was more vibrant and popular than many early triumphal analysis of the reformation allowed for, there were, nonetheless, critics of Catholicism within England. He traces the earlier opposition to the church as arising from three primary groups: those educated clerics and laymen who desired reform within the church, the small pockets of Lollards within England who opposed traditional religion, and the group of people influenced by European reformation thought who would later work to implement doctrinal change within the Church of England. Professor Wrightson also provides an analysis of late medieval piety and the role that the traditional church played in people's daily lives at the local level prior to the reformation. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Religion 05:08 - Chapter 2. The Pre-Reformation Church 14:51 - Chapter 3. Potential Weaknesses 29:31 - Chapter 4. Criticism Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Fall 2009.

Top Videos -  loading... Change country
Load 5 more videos
 
Nelze přehrát
00:00/00:00
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
ZAVŘÍT
ZAVŘÍT
ZAVŘÍT